February 21 2017

DIY-CDN, a good read and some ideas to expand.

So I came across an interesting read at scalescale.com regarding building a small CDN network using DigitalOcean, and I wanted to take a look at it to see how we can expand upon it even further.

To check out the article:
http://www.scalescale.com/rolling-your-own-cdn-build-a-3-continent-cdn-for-25-in-1-hour/#

Of course, one of the first things I wanted to check out was the inclusion of 1&1 CloudServers. DigitalOcean gives us the wider range of datacenters and (currently) the inclusion of IPv6 so that any servers (currently only DO, 1&1 is still in process of rolling out) can be provided for, but for now we’re going to remove that as a need so that we can fully rate all servers on the same plane without having AAAA records going to 1 datacenter and the A record going to another.

Here’s the setup we’re going to look at:

Nameserver:
1&1 US CloudServer: NGCS M $9.99

Servers:

North America
1&1 CloudServer | Kansas | NGCS S $4.99
DO Droplet | SanFran. | Droplet $5.00
DO Droplet | NewYork | Droplet $5.00
DO Droplet | Toronto | Droplet $5.00

EU
1&1 CloudServer | London | NGCS S $4.99
DO Droplet | Amsterdam | $5.00
1&1 CloudServer | Frankfurt | NGCS S $4.99
1&1 CloudServer | Spain | NGCS S $4.99
DO Droplet | Bangalore | $5.00

VPN/Datacenter Connections

1&1 CloudServer | Kansas | NGCS S $4.99

GlusterFS/Galera (DB) – Clustering the Filesystem and DB

1&1 CloudServer | Kansas | NGCS S $4.99
DO Droplet | NewYork | Droplet $5.00

 

So here’s the plan as it’s working out in my head (still working on the implementation):

Nameservers:

The nameserver is setup just like its shown in the ScaleScale article. I choose to use 1&1 due to the fact that we can have load balancing for free on the NS, which allows for expansion later if we want failover protection.

Servers:

  • The servers in this test will be configured with a simple LAMP stack.
  • Each 1&1 server is connected to the VPN server via Private Network.
    • This allows so that any infrastructure traffic stays off of the public network, and doesn’t clog the pipeline
    • VPN connection is then established to provide the IPs

 

[To Be Continued – LastUpdated 2/20/2017]



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Posted February 21, 2017 by Timothy G in category "Uncategorized

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