July 16 2016

Digital Ocean releases “Block Storage”

For those who have been using DigitalOcean droplets, you’ve probably found yourself in need of additional disk space outside of what your Droplet originally provides. Originally you had to either expand your Droplet, which meant unneeded increases in vCores and Ram along with the price they warrant, or use another provider like AWS and link that storage remotely. Obviously the price increase and resource pollution makes the former a nightmare and the latter means yet another company to deal with and latency possibilities.

Instead, the new solution, is to just add a NFS that you can pay for with the additional diskspace you need. You continue to pay for the droplet size of your choice, and then choose to pay an additional $0.10 per GB that you need every month. The current sizes range from 1GB all the way up to a whopping 16TB of disk space, $0.10/month and $160.00/month respectively.

You can read more about DigitalOcean’s new feature by visiting their official blog here:

https://www.digitalocean.com/company/blog/block-storage-more-space-to-scale/

March 28 2016

CentOS 7 | Reset Root Password | Grub Method

Imagine the situation where your Administrator is fired/quits, and with him takes the root password of the server and need access to the server right now. Fortunately, Linux makes the process incredibly easy since you have local access, at least in the eyes of the Linux OS. All this method requires is the ability to manipulate GRUB, so if you have a way of seeing the grub menu and working with it, then this method is for you.

Let’s Get Started

  1. Reboot the server and get to the Grub Menu
  2. Go to the line that says “linux16”.
    1. There’s going to be a few more lines compared to CentOS6‘s method, just scroll slowly, it’s there.
  3. Using the Right arrow, go into the “linux16” line and find the word “ro”.
    1. This is telling the server to boot into Read Only. The server boots that and then upon login/mounting you get a Read/Write access. We want to bypass that.
  4. Change “ro” to “rw” and follow it up with “init=/sysroot/bin/sh”
    1. “ro” becomes “rw init=/sysroot/bin/sh”
  5. Press Ctrl-X to boot with this configuration
    1. Note that this doesn’t save the configuration, just lets you boot into it for this Session
  6. Now you should have Root access, type the “passwd” command to change the password.
  7. Reboot the server and use your new password to login.

This method is great for 1&1’s Dedicated Servers using the Serial Console, 1&1’s Cloud Servers using either the KVM/VNC console, and Digitalocean’s KVM console. As long as you can see GRUB, you can change the root password.

March 28 2016

CentOS 6 | Root Password Reset (GRUB Method)

Imagine the situation where your Administrator is fired/quits, and with him takes the root password of the server and need access to the server right now. Fortunately, Linux makes the process incredibly easy since you have local access, at least in the eyes of the Linux OS. All this method requires is the ability to manipulate GRUB, so if you have a way of seeing the grub menu and working with it, then this method is for you.

Let’s get started:

  1. Boot to the grub menu
  2. At the Grub menu press ‘e’ for edit.
  3. You should see 3 lines, scroll to the kernel line
  4. Using the Right Arrow, scroll to the end of that line
  5. Type the number “1” at the end and then hit “Enter”
  6. Now you’re looking at the 3 line again, hit ‘B’ to boot with this configuration
    1. Note: This is not saving the configuration, just booting you into Single User Mode for this session.
  7. You should now be booted into Single User Mode with Root access. Change the password with the “passwd” command
    1. # passwd
  8. Reboot the server with the “reboot” command

This method is great for 1&1’s Dedicated Servers using the Serial Console, 1&1’s Cloud Servers using either the KVM/VNC console, and Digitalocean’s KVM console. As long as you can see GRUB, you can change the root password.